Empowering Creativity through Movement & Dance
Tamalpa Experience Workshops
Meet the Work




Our workshops and classes for the public are offered throughout the year for those interested in shorter experiences of our work which focus on creativity and development of personal resources

Movement as a Life/Art Process
Featuring Anna Halprin with Rosario Sammartino

This workshop offers time to feel and to listen deeply to the powerful intelligence of the body, to play and express with imagination through the arts, to create personal and collective dances that have meaning, and to bring new vision to the life themes that matter to us in our daily lives. Spend five days with Anna at the historic Halprin Mountain Home Studio designed for her by her husband, famed architect, Lawrence Halprin. Rosario Sammartino, Tamalpa Institute faculty member, will be facilitating several of the afternoon sessions. Set amidst redwood and oak trees, Mountain Home features indoor and outdoor studios and sits on the flanks of Mount Tamalpais in Kentfield, California. It is a short drive to San Francisco, Berkeley, and the Sonoma and Napa wine countries – an ideal location for a workshop and a holiday.

Tamalpa Experience Workshops
These 1-day and 2-day intensive workshops are designed to give participants an experiential understanding of our work in movement-based healing arts. Recommended as an introduction to our training program. Find the schedule on our Calendar!

Meet the Work: An introduction to the Life/Art Process
These workshops introduce the work presented in the Tamalpa trainings. An experience in embodied creativity, movement will be explored as a metaphor for how we live and what we long for.

APPRENTICES
L 2 students and graduates often apprentice in our programs as a way to expand their practical training through observation, mentorship and supervised facilitation of other students. Apprentices are thoroughly versed in ways to witness and participate that are supportive and non-interruptive to program participants.



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